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Places Texas Village Creek State Park

Village Creek at Village Creek State Park, Lumberton, Texas

village creek
Village Creek State Park is located about ten miles north of Beaumont on the edge of the Big Thicket. Village Creek, where the park gets its name, is one of the few free-flowing creeks in Texas and is a tributary of the Neches River. The 1,090 acre park is heavily forested and a good representation of the Piney Woods. The Piney Woods is a large area of coniferous forests, dominated by several species of pine as well as hardwoods extending from eastern Texas, through northwestern Louisiana, southwestern Arkansas and the southeastern corner of Oklahoma. (Photo captured with an iPhone 6 Plus)

There are 25 RV spaces with water and electrical services in the campground. Due to the popularity of the park reservations for a spot at the campground are almost a necessity year round. It was fortunate we had a reservation for our stay in early December – the campground was full. Some of the walk-in camping sites are subject to flooding and may be closed from time to time so it would be advisable to contact the state park for availability.

Slough - swamp covered in leaves
A leaf littered slough, one of many, along the trails in Village Creek State Park, TX

The inky black waters of a leaf covered slough in the state park reflects the blue sky and clouds.  Depending on the weather some of the trails are soggy but not impassable.  According to park staff some trails are closed during periods of heavy rains and high water.

Walking Trail
One of many trails in Village Creek State Park. Even on a December morning there is the sounds of critters scurrying through the leaves and pine needles in the woods.

A variety of well maintained trails provide easy walks through out the park.  The greatest obstacle for me was the interest the two Australian Sheppard dogs found in the squirrels seen, the sound of unseen things and the smells only a dog could appreciate – it is hard to maintain a pace with the two leashed dogs finding something of interest in almost every plant, twig, leaf, bush, tree, pine needle and everything else.